Tag Archives: marketing

Power 150 – Advertising Age

Todd Andrlik ranks the top media and marketing blogs for Advertising Age’s Power 150 list.

SELECTION METHODOLOGY:
What Todd came up with is a largely objective ranking, which is probably why it’s already gained such popularity among marketing and media bloggers. It uses a basic multimetric algorithm to obtain a final ranking based on the sum of eight sources, seven of which come from Google, Bloglines, Alexa, Yahoo! and Technorati. The last is Todd’s own personal subjective measure.

See the list at Power 150 – Advertising Age.

7 tricks to Viral Web Marketing – Baekdal.com

Viral marketing (word-of-mouth marketing) is a really cool thing. Just think about it… instead of spending an insane amount of money on newspapers ads, TV commercials or banner ads, you spent nothing – and let your fans do all the work for you.

With viral marketing, your campaigns will suddenly get a life of its own – and start to spread like a virus. Everyone want to see it, and when they do, they all want to share it.

It is immensely powerful, usually having 500-1000 times greater impact than what you get from regular advertisements.

Read more via 7 tricks to Viral Web Marketing – Articles – Baekdal.com

Marketing to Moms? Read the Digital Mom Report – guykawasaki.com

by: Guy Kawasaki

Razorfish and CafeMom issued a “Digital Mom” report that examines the role of digital technology in modern moms. (Do yourself a favor and click on the download PDF icon to read the report. It’s the second to the last icon in the navigation bar.)

Here is a quick summary to entice you to read the whole thing. Anyone who is trying to market products or services for moms should read this excellent report.

  1. “Social media and text messaging, instant messaging, and gaming, now used by the majority of digital moms, are no longer niche activities.”
  2. “At the same time, moms with children 12 or older are more likely than moms of children under 12 to use gaming and video. Marketers have an opportunity to respond to these trends by acknowledging that a ‘one-size-fits-all’ strategy against moms may not work.”
  3. “Marketers should recognize the dual purposes (communicating with peers and monitoring their kids) moms of older children have for engaging with emerging technologies, particularly social channels. They should learn more about the challenges moms face when embracing technology, and provide them with better resources and information to help them guide their children.”
  4. “Marketers have an opportunity to utilize communications channels like social networking, text messaging and gaming to facilitate conversation among moms and influence decision making.”
  5. “Marketers should consider marketing to mom as both an interconnected woman and a mom, as her interests extend beyond parenting.”
  6. “Among digital moms, the gap is closing between TV and other channels in creating initial awareness about products. Marketers should consider the penetration level and relative influence of each channel when determining how, when, and where to reach digital moms along the purchase funnel.”

If you’d like a quick way to scan what moms are blogging about, check out moms.alltop.

Original Post: How to Change the World: Marketing to Moms? Read the Digital Mom Report

Seth’s Blog: What is viral marketing?

by Seth Godin

Seth Godin's HeadViral marketing is an idea that spreads–and an idea that while it is spreading actually helps market your business or cause.

Two kinds of viral marketing: The original classic sort in which the marketing is the product and which a self-amplifying cycle occurs. Hotmail, for example, or YouTube. The more people use them, the more people see them. The more people see them, the more people use them. The product or service must be something that improves once more people use it.

A second kind has evolved over the last few years, and that’s a marketing campaign that spreads but isn’t the product itself. Shepard Fairey’s poster of Barack Obama was everywhere, because people chose to spread it. It was viral (it spread) and it was marketing (because it made an argument–a visual one–for a candidate.)

Something being viral is not, in an of itself, viral marketing. Who cares that 32,000,000 people saw your stupid video? It didn’t market you or your business in a tangible, useful way.

Read more via Seth’s Blog: What is viral marketing?